Category Archives: Our Sponsors

Stakeholder financial support for operations allows us to dedicate 100% of public donations to literacy

We strive to raise dedicated funds for operations from private donors and magazine industry champions, so we can reach our objective to spend 100% of the consumer and local business funds we raise on direct literacy programs and services – getting new and recycled magazines into the hands, homes, and hearts of the children and families we serve.

Dedicating 100% of public donations directly to address our literacy programs is an audacious goal and bold statement.  It’s only possible with generous corporate, magazine industry, and stakeholder support.

The Magazine Publishers Family Literacy Project (MagazineLiteracy.org) is a 501(c)3 charity.  We rely on financial support from any and every magazine industry stakeholder throughout the supply chain – editors, publishers, circulation pros, printers, distributors, fulfillment shops, ad agencies, and other champions to pay our administrative and operational expenses.

We know that your financial support is precious and greatly appreciate every bit.  We strive to use those dollars in a responsible, effective, and efficient manner.  Every organization has administrative and operating costs to sustain their missions, and we are no different.  We have to “keep the lights on” to conceive, plan, execute, and manage our literacy projects and to grow to our full potential to meet our responsibility against enormous literacy challenges.

With private, corporate,  and magazine industry stakeholder donations covering our operating expenses, we can achieve our goal of dedicating 100% of public donations to direct literacy programs and services, inspiring even more giving by the consumers and local businesses who support our community programs.

To stretch those operating dollars far, we run our operations extremely lean and achieve a very high rate of return on the funds invested in our operations.  Here’s how:

  • We leverage advanced technology, open source software, cloud-based services, crowdsourcing, and strong partnerships with technology and media powerhouses, such as Google Apps, Salesforce.com, Automattic, the inventors of WordPress, Crowdspring for pro bono graphic design, Texterity, Auryn Creative for web design, Publish2Profit,  Texterity, and many others for communications, volunteer support, community organizing and collaboration tools, and social media.
  • We actively develop and train a network of thousands of volunteers in hundreds of communities and campuses who deliver all of our essential activities from grassroots outreach to magazine collection and delivery logistics to public relations and fundraising.
  • We manage our project online from virtual locations, and utilize cost-effective shared cooperative “coworking” office space, as well as partnerships with other agencies for handling logistics.
  • We collect and process financial donations online in a partnership with Network for Good – a very effective and efficient method for engaging the consumers and businesses who support our literacy programs and operations.  Network for Good is a turnkey solution with tremendous experience in the charitable market and excellent, reliable fundraising tools and customer service.  Most important, their 3% transaction costs are at or below any alternative for credit card processing.

Why we use Network for Good to process our online donations

Most importantly, Network for Good’s 3% transaction costs are at or below all alternatives for credit card processing and they provide an option for our donors to cover the transaction cost, leaving us with 100% of their donation with no fees.

We know that your financial support is precious and greatly appreciate every bit of it.  We strive to use those dollars in a responsible, effective, and efficient manner.  We run our operations very lean and leverage technology, volunteer support, community organizing, and strong partnerships with magazine industry stakeholders to stretch those dollars as far as we can to serve the literacy needs of at-risk children and families and community literacy programs.

Collecting financial donations online is a very effective and efficient method for engaging the consumers and businesses who support our literacy programs and operations.  We strive to raise dedicated funds for operations from private donors and magazine industry champions, so we can reach our objective to spend 100% of the consumer and local business funds we raise on direct literacy programs and services – getting new and recycled magazines into the hands, homes, and hearts of the children and families we serve.

Network for Good

We have selected Network for Good to process our online donations for some very important and good reasons:

 

  • Most importantly, Network for Good’s 3% transaction costs are at or below all alternatives for credit card processing and they provide an option for our donors to cover the transaction cost, leaving us with 100% of their donation with no fees.
  • Their solution is turnkey and comprehensive, allowing us to raise online funds from anyone, anywhere, anytime.
  • They have an enormousness wealth of experience serving the fundraising needs of non-profit, charitable organizations, so we can rely on them for reliable fundraising tools, services, and advice, while focusing all our bandwidth on our literacy mission.
  • Their robust suite of online fundraising tools are well-tested and maintained with excellent and expedited customer support.

crowdSPRING has sprung for MagazineLiteracy.org ad campaign

Please join us in thanking the folks at crowdSPRING who have adopted MagazineLiteracy.org as their current Give Back client.  This enables us to tap tens of thousands of very talented and creative designers to produce our online banner ad campaign.

Founded by Ross Kimbarovsky and Mike Samson, crowdSPRING was started to help people from around the world access creative talent, and to help creatives from across the globe find new customers.  They started the Give Back program to support worthy causes.   The staff have taken a personal interest and hands on approach to getting us set up on the crowdSPRING website. Our collaboration puts us in a sweet spot that leverages high tech online crowd sourcing to promote our print magazine literacy initiative.

Our top priorities for magazine distribution are literacy programs that serve homeless children, teens, and families; moms and children in domestic violence shelters; foster children; families served by food pantries; and youth in mentoring programs.

Our objective is to create advertising and promotions that drive consumers to MagazineLiteracy.org, where they can take immediate action to meet literacy needs by donating funds, volunteer time, and magazines.

Like a bowl of soup with warm buttered bread… or a cup of hot chocolate and marshmallows…  our banner ad campaign will express the comfort that a magazine can bring to a child and mom who have fled to a homeless or domestic violence shelter.

Together, we are changing the world – one magazine, one child, one mom… one banner ad click at a time.

Thank you for your passion to serve.

First, I can not thank our volunteers and donors enough for their interest and participation in supporting the mission and goals of MagazineLiteracy.org, the first and only global, magazine industry-wide literacy campaign for children and families.

We have accomplished so much thanks to the commitment and self-initiative of hundreds of individuals. Still, we have so much to do, with your help, to meet our full promise to children and families who want to learn and love to read magazines.

We have learned many lessons, doing many things well, and some things not so well. One area that needs improvement is our communication and follow-up with the volunteers and supporters who are so generous in offering their time, ideas, dollars, magazines, and passion.

Due to many intense economic and social forces, we face a perfect storm of challenge, need, opportunity, and responsibility. As an all volunteer organization with a global vision, the interest in our work and the demands placed on our organization have exceeded our capacity serve them. We risk neglecting a timely opportunity to deploy willing volunteers and to tap generous benefactors to meet local literacy needs, while addressing global environmental challenges.

We are grateful for the patience of our stakeholders while we rethink and re-engineer MagazineLiteracy.org through these “growing pains.” We are stronger and even more determined to succeed and to better prepare and deploy our volunteers and other resources in community service across the U.S., and around the world. This is both an opportunity and a responsibility for MagazineLiteracy.org.

We still have a journey ahead of us to strengthen our ability to provide steady, sustainable support to our volunteers and donors. As we develop this capability, we want to continue to organize effective, successful community based magazine literacy projects. We can provide access to collaboration and social networking tools and information to help community literacy projects to grow and prosper, but we need our supporters to be the seeds of this vast endeavor. We need to rely on the dedication and the self-initiative of our volunteers and donors to self-educate, and to self-organize, and to lead and promote magazine literacy projects that identify and meet the needs of children and families in their own communities. From that will emerge a massive marketplace of great ideas shared between and among local MagPower Teams, using the tools and communications channels available at MagazineLiteracy.org.

Our first task is to organize individual volunteers into community teams, so they can work together to meet local needs. We will utilize an online team collaboration tool, and other methods, to organize each of our community volunteer MagTeams and to serve as a repository for information and to foster communication across local groups.

Many supporters have already organized very important magazine literacy projects in their own communities. We want to hear about and celebrate these projects, as models for others to replicate. Please be sure to contact us with the details so we can post your stories.

About ten years ago, I walked from Washington DC to Boston – twenty miles a day, for thirty days. I could not imagine how I would begin, yet alone complete such a walk of one million footsteps. How did I do it? How did I get to my destination over such a vast distance of so many horizons? One step at a time. Let these be the first steps in your so important and meaningful journey to find and to feed children and families hungry to read. Working and walking together, we are changing the world, one magazine, one child, one family at a time. Thank you again for your passion to serve.

Tremendous forces rock our world of magazine literacy

It’s timely to reflect on the tremendous forces and upheavals in the economic, political, and community landscapes that are shaping the ecosystem for our magazine literacy mission. Financial markets are down – then up – then down again. Government, education, human, and community services face enormous funding gaps that demand doing more with less. Within this context, the value of our new and recycled magazines increases significantly for teachers and other community literacy agents helping children and families who want to learn and love to read. Getting reading materials into homes becomes even more imperative as the fabric of safety net wears thin. On the other hand, citizen engagement and activism are way up, thanks to a sweeping non-partisan, national call to public service that will amplify in coming months. Our challenge is to improve our capabilities and collaboration to better inventory and spotlight literacy needs, while channeling and focusing the generous outpouring of compassion and support to meet those needs. Help us to find and feed those hungry to read. Join us to change the world – one magazine – one new reader at a time.

Webconference.com – a virtual coffee shop – takes our global grassroots collaboration to the next level

Today, Webconference.com has helped us to launch an online conference and collaboration tool that gets us to an entirely game-changing level of teamwork. Utilizing the webconference.com service, we can now connect the many volunteers and literacy agents that come together to collect and distribute magazines to new readers. These meetings can happen anywhere, anytime. The web conference capability allows our teams to meet and to share information and lessons learned, within their own groups and across teams, pollinating MagazineLiteracy.org in communities across the U.S. and around the world.

Our success at MagazineLiteracy.org depends on organizing and equipping grassroots, community-based teams around the world with the information and tools they need to find and feed children and families hungry to read. So more invested time and dollars can provide direct support to new readers and the literacy agents we serve, we leverage online technology extensively to maximize our team-building success. webconference.com is a feature-rich application that allows us to integrate VoIP, video, screen-sharing, Web touring, live annotation, whiteboard, presentations, and file sharing, as well as recording of our events and training materials. We are looking forward to all that is now possible with our vastly improved communications and collaboration platform provided by webconference.com.

A Lucky day for magazine literacy

Thank you Conde Nast for shipping us 11 boxes of Lucky magazine, which will be recycled to new readers in homeless and domestic violence shelters, and in bags of groceries delivered to families by food pantries.

The question is often raised whether a homeless, or hungry, or battered person can really appreciate or enjoy a lifestyle magazine like Lucky, filled with page after page of glorious, though seemingly irrelevant or unattainable trinkets. My reaction? Though I may never pilot a futuristic jet into space, I love to read about them blazing through the pages of Popular Science magazine. I may never own a 75 foot yacht, but my smile widens at the sight of a magazine cover filled with a classic sailing vessel bent windward. Are these things any more relevant or attainable to me outside my pure joy discovering them in magazines bought from the newsstand or that arrive in my mailbox? (In the spirit of full disclosure, and much to my family’s dismay, I did purchase my own wooden sinkhole at auction on ebay – a classic 25 foot folkboat – $80 to own it… $800 to move it to my backyard for restoration).

For ourselves, we may wish to see things, not as they are today, but as they can be tomorrow. No matter our current station in life, we can hope and dream, and set goals, or just simply enjoy the world around us without expectation – whether a raindrop sliding down a window pane, a pretty weed flowering in a sidewalk crack, or a wonderful magazine. These are all gifts.

It is not necessarily so much in their colorful, material glamor that magazines of any type create value for new readers. But, in in the access; the availability; the reach; and the freedom to read about those things that bring knowledge, pleasure and joy. In this, we are created equal.